workplace charging program

Answer:

While there is not a one-size-fits-all solution for workplace charging, there are a number of resources available to help employers design, implement, and manage the right program for their organization.

 

Assess Demand

Employers considering whether workplace charging is right for their organization will want to start by assessing employee demand with an employee survey (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/downloads/sample-employee-survey-workplace-charging-planning). Once this assessment is complete, employers may set goals for meeting workplace charging demand, either by planning to meet the entire need (i.e., all drivers that have expressed or will express interest in PEV charging) or by dedicating a percentage of parking spaces to PEV charging. For example, Google has a goal to dedicate 5% of all parking spaces to workplace charging.

 

Procure and Install

Employers should determine what types of charging stations to purchase. There are a few decisions to make, including the following:

      • Charging Level:  There are benefits and drawbacks to both Level 1 and Level 2 charging stations in the workplace. Employers must evaluate which option is best for their facilities. For more information about the differences between charging levels and their merits for workplace charging, see the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Workplace Charging Station Basics page (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/workplace-charging-station-basics).
      • Networking:  Charging station networks provide maintenance, customer service, and energy monitoring capabilities, and collect payment on behalf of the station owner. However, networks require a fee, and employers will need to consider whether the convenience of charging networks outweighs the financial cost. For more information, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging Level 2 page (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/level-2-charging-workplace).

Employers should also be sure to get quotes from a number of charging station providers. For more guidance, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging Sample Request for Proposal document (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/downloads/request-proposal-guidance). Employers will work with their electrical contractor to determine charging station placement; station installation can be an expensive process, but employers can minimize costs by siting stations in locations that require minimal trenching, boring, and electrical panel upgrades. For more information about siting and installation, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging Equipment and Installation Costs page (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/workplace-charging-equipment-and-installation-costs).

 

Manage

A well-managed, well-planned workplace charging program can ensure station access to all employees, promote strong communication between employers and station users, and encourage responsible station use.

      • Registration and Liability:  Many employers require employees to register their PEV, which allows the employer to identify the number of vehicles using their charging stations. For example, employers can give registered vehicles a mirror hangtag or window sticker that identifies the vehicle as having permission to use the charging stations. A registration form may also include language that requires vehicle owners to agree not to hold the employer responsible for any damage to the vehicle that occurs while it is parked at the charging station. For more information, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging Registration and Liability page (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/workplace-charging-management-policies-registration-liability).
      • Station Sharing:  It is important to emphasize that workplace charging is a privilege, not a right. Employees may be obligated to share stations with their colleagues and comply with established charging time limits. While an employer can set up systems for sharing stations, such as reserving the station (similar to how an employee would reserve a conference room) or establishing a set schedule for use, most employers allow users to resolve station-sharing conflicts themselves. However, it is important to establish consequences for violating station policies, such as using a station for less than four hours. By framing workplace charging as a privilege, an employer reserves the right to restrict access for employees that routinely violate company policy. For more information about how to establish workplace charging policies and encourage station sharing, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging Station Sharing page (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/workplace-charging-management-policies-sharing).
      • Pricing:  While most employers offer workplace charging for free, charging for station use can be a good way to manage demand. Employers may charge for electricity (e.g., per kilowatt hour) or for time (e.g., per hour), depending on preference and applicable regulations. Employers can motivate employees to move their vehicles and share the stations by charging a nominal fee (or no fee) for the first set number of hours (e.g., four hours) and then raise the fee for subsequent time that the vehicle is parked in the space. For more information, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging Pricing page (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/workplace-charging-management-policies-pricing).

 

For more resources about workplace charging, see the DOE’s Workplace Charging website (https://energy.gov/eere/vehicles/workplace-charging), explore the Clean Cities’ Workplace Charging Toolkit (https://cleancities.energy.gov/technical-assistance/workplace-charging /), or contact the TRS at technicalresponse@icf.com.

Diverse partners across Tennessee are partnering to bring EV awareness events to cities from Memphis to Kingsport!  These events will take place between Saturday, September 10 and Saturday, September 17.

 

>>>  Please click here to view the press release!  <<<

 

 

 

Thanks to Nissan, Calloway Oil of Maryville, TN and Brightfield Transportation Solutions (out of Asheville, NC) there are three new DC fast charge (DCFC) units in the greater Knoxville area that can quickly refuel electric vehicles (EVs). Working with the East Tennessee Clean Fuels Coalition, these chargers have been at added in Knoxville,  Maryville and Lenoir City. All three sites are at Calloway Oil’s E‐Z Stop convenience stores (Exxon/Mobil):

  1. 8605 Walbrook Dr, Knoxville, TN 37923
  2. 1758 W. Broadway, Maryville, TN 37803
  3. 1111 US Hwy 321, Lenoir City, TN 37771

A grand opening event was held at the Knoxville location on August 18, 2016 to celebrate both these chargers and additional chargers that have been installed throughout East TN so far this year, thanks to the leadership of Nissan North America.

See the email and press release announcement for the event here.

See the “Resources” tab on this site and the “EV Station Locator” page to see the new sites that also include 4 new DCFC units in the greater Chattanooga area, 1 new unit in Cleveland and 1 new unit in Dandridge, TN. (On that page, use the “more search options” to uncheck the Level 1 and Level 2 chargers so that you can more clearly see the DCFC units across the state).

Several of the units will help enable greater EV travel between Chattanooga and Knoxville, while the Dandridge location is helping fill-in the corridor between Knoxville and the Tri-Cities.

Links:

 

Leaf charging

[fusion_text]Need to know the basics about electric vehicles and what it takes to keep them charged up?  Check out this helpful presentation put together by the Black Bear Solar Institute….Click to view EV presentation[/fusion_text]

[fusion_text]Even as the fuel-efficiency of gasoline powered cars continues to improve, the carbon footprint of producing oil continues to increase. Electricity powered transportation, even when partially supplied by a coal-powered grid, still remains one of the cleanest options toward zero-emissions vehicles.

Read more about why oil is getting dirtier while alternative fuels are getting cleaner in this informative and eye-opening article written by David Roberts of Vox…Read More [/fusion_text]

Look out Tesla, there’s a new kid on the block: BMW is showing a promising future in the electric vehicle market. But can the iconic luxury manufacturer take on Tesla?

Read the story here.

Skeptical that electric vehicles will ever catch on? Bob Sheth of Environmental News Network disagrees.

 

Find out why here.

The US Department of Energy’s Workplace Charging Challenge is hosting a webinar addressing ideas related to engaging employers and community stakeholders to host successful workplace charging outreach events. Speakers include Linda Benevides of Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs, Samantha Bingham and Lori Clark of Chicago Area Clean Cities and Dallas-Ft. Worth Area Clean Cities, respectively, and Ben Prochazka of the Electrification Coalition.

Please Join us from 2-3pm EDT on September 29th for this relevant informational session!

To learn more about the Workplace Charging Challenge, click here.

To register, click here.

 

Driving electric may become a whole lot easier thanks to a new technology being tested in the UK.

Read the story here

 

 

The assumption that gas prices and the use of alternative vehicles have an inverse relationship (i.e. one goes up, the other goes down and vice versa) is certainly well founded. However, Plug-In American decided to sort the facts from the myths, and their results may surprise you.

Click here to access the story!