VEHICLES – EV BASICS

There are a number of electrified vehicles on the market, that meet different needs of drivers. Some vehicles can plug-in to an electricity source, drawing electricity directly from the grid, while others use an internal combustion engine to create energy stored in on-board batteries. Using electricity to power vehicles can have significant fuel efficiency, energy security and emissions benefits.

Hybrid Electric Vehicles

HEVs are powered by an internal combustion engine or other propulsion source that runs on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The battery is charged through regenerative braking and by the internal combustion engine and is not plugged in to charge.

EXAMPLES:  Audi Q5 Hybrid, Ford C-Max Hybrid, Kia Optima, Toyota Prius & Camry Hybrids.

See full list of hybrid vehicles available in 2015.

Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

PHEVs are powered by an internal combustion engine that can run on conventional or alternative fuel and an electric motor that uses energy stored in a battery. The vehicle can be plugged into an electric power source to charge the battery. Regenerative braking technology can also charge the battery when decelerating. Some PHEVs are also called extended range electric vehicles (EREVs).

EXAMPLES:  BMW i3 Range Extender, Cadillac ELR, Ford Fusion Energi, Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid, Toyota Prius Plug-in.

See full list of plug-in hybrid vehicles available in 2015.

All-Electric Vehicles

EVs are powered by an electric motor that uses electricity stored on-board in batteries. EV batteries are charged by plugging the vehicle into an electric power source. EVs are sometimes referred to as battery electric vehicles (BEVs). The battery can also be charged through regenerative braking technology.

EXAMPLES:  Chevy Spark, Fiat 500e, Nissan Leaf, Tesla Model S, Volkswagen e-Golf.

See full list of full-electric vehicles available in 2015.